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Intelligence Wars Thomas Powers

Intelligence Wars

Thomas Powers

Published
ISBN : 9781615600540
Paperback
504 pages
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 About the Book 

For much of the twentieth century, the American public was astonishingly innocent about the role of intelligence organizations in international affairs. That changed abruptly in 1961, argues Thomas Powers, when a covert US-backed invasion of CubaMoreFor much of the twentieth century, the American public was astonishingly innocent about the role of intelligence organizations in international affairs. That changed abruptly in 1961, argues Thomas Powers, when a covert US-backed invasion of Cuba failed all too conspicuously at the Bay of Pigs. Afterward, everyone knew about the CIA. By the mid-1970s, congressional investigations had exposed many of its darkest secrets - though some questions may never be answered. The essays collected in this volume tell stories of shadowy successes, ghastly failures, and, more often, gripping uncertainties. They range from the exploits of Wild Bill Donovans OSS during the Second World War, through the CIAs long cold war struggle with its Russian adversary, to debates about the use of secret intelligence in a democratic society. Here too are analyses of the Kennedys and their obsession with getting rid of Castro, real, suspected, and imagined Communist spies, the weird worldview of counterintelligence expert James J. Angleton, the scandals of Soviet moles Aldrich Ames and Robert Hanssen, and urgent contemporary issues such as whether the CIA and the FBI can defend America against terrorism. What emerges from these essays is a keen sense of what the intelligence business is like: the kinds of people who do it, the kinds of things they do well, or badly, and the ways they try to give the government that employs them what it wants.